Tropical Storm Nate Soaks Central America; Forecast to Target Cancún, Then U.S. Gulf Coast as a Hurricane


Current Storm StatusTropical Storm Nate is moving over Nicaragua and Honduras, and will threaten parts of the U.S. Gulf Coast as a strong tropical storm or hurricane this weekend, after passing near the resorts of Cancún and Cozumel.

The newly-formed tropical storm is currently located near the border of Nicaragua and Honduras, just inland of the Caribbean Sea, and is moving northwest at 5 to 10 mph.

According to the National Hurricane Center, Nate was upgraded from a tropical depression Thursday morning based on radar from San Andrés, and island east of Nicaragua, indicating a partial eyewall and a surface pressure measurement over Nicaragua found to be lower than previous advisories…. read more

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‘California Is Obviously Shaking’ – The Ring Of Fire Is Restless As Californians Fear The San Andreas Fault Is Ready To Blow


Events in September 2017, including but not limited to the 8.1 magnitude earthquake off the coast of RingOfFireAndreas1.jpgMexico in early September, followed by a 7.1 magnitude on the 19th, along with the evacuations happening now where 50,000 are being forced to flee their homes amid fears Mount Agung, in Bali, could erupt at any moment, and a state of emergency that has been declared on the Vanuatu island of Ambae as the Monaro volcano continues to erupt, show that we are seeing a level of earth activity that is increasingly concerning.

Over the past weekend, Mexico was again shaken up by another 6.2 magnitude earthquake and no less than 26 smaller earthquakes have rattled California in a 24 hour period, and 176 earthquakes in a seven day period, causing some serious alarm over the much-talked about “big one” hitting along the 800-mile fissure that runs almost the length of California, called the San Andreas Fault.

Via Newsweek:

“It’s a different system,” says Matthew Blackett, Senior Lecturer in Physical Geography and Natural Hazards at Britain’s Coventry University, “But the system that is causing these quakes in Mexico is by and large similar to what’s happening in California.” In both locations, tectonic plates are sliding past one another…. read more

New earthquake, magnitude 6.1, shakes jittery Mexico


A man drinks a glass of water given to him by a restaurant in Mexico Citys La Condesa neighborhood, Friday, Sept. 22, 2017, four days after the 7.1 earthquake. In the stylish Condesa neighborhood young revelers typically spill out from dimly lit barA strong new earthquake shook Mexico on Saturday, causing new alarm in a country reeling from two yet-more-powerful quakes this month that have killed nearly 400 people.

The U.S. Geological Survey said the new, magnitude 6.1 temblor was centered about 11 miles (18 kilometers) south-southeast of Matias Romero in the state of Oaxaca, which was the region most battered by a magnitude 8.1 quake on Sept. 7.

It was among thousands of aftershocks recorded in the wake of that earlier quake, the most powerful to hit Mexico in 32 years, which killed at least 90 people.

There were some early reports of damage in Oaxaca. Milenio TV broadcast images of a bridge that partially collapsed…. read more

Oh my Lord Jesus, We pray for Mexico!

Mexico earthquake: Children killed at collapsed primary school


Mexico City street after quakeAt least 21 children and five adults died at a primary school which collapsed in Mexico City during Tuesday’s quake, the government says. The shallow, 7.1 magnitude quake killed at least 230 people in total and caused major damage across states in the centre of the country.

Desperate searches for survivors under the rubble are continuing. Hopes rose at the school when a girl was located alive and a delicate operation to rescue her is under way. Dozens of buildings collapsed across the country, including several churches where worshippers were killed.

Families with young children could be seen sleeping outside their homes in the street in the capital…. read more

Earthquake measuring 5.3 hits Japan hours after Mexico quake kills at least 30


An earthquake measuring 5.3 has hit northern Japan.

It came hours after at least 30 people were killed in an 8.1 earthquake in Mexico, sparking a Tsunami warning in Japan.

The epicentre of the 20km-deep earthquake hit the north western Akita Prefecture just before 10am local time (1.26pm GMT).

“This earthquake poses no tsunami risk,” the agency said on its website.

Japan Met Agency issued a tsunami warning for the country at 2am local time, over fears high waves triggered by the Mexico earthquake could hit Japan… read more

At least 32 die after massive quake off southern Mexico


MEXICO CITY, Sept 7 (Reuters) – At least 32 people were killed after a massive 8.1 magnitude earthquake, one of the biggest recorded in Mexico, struck off the country’s southern coast late on Thursday, causing cracks in buildings and triggering a small tsunami, authorities said.

The quake was apparently stronger than a devastating 1985 temblor that flattened swathes of Mexico City and killed thousands, but this time, damage to the city was limited.

A number of buildings suffered severe damage in parts of southern Mexico. Some of the worst initial reports came from the town of Juchitan in Oaxaca state, where sections of the town hall, a hotel, a bar and other buildings were reduced to rubble…. read more

Mexico Residents Fear a New Volcano Is Being Formed Beneath Them After Eruption of Smoke, Gas


The site of a July 9 eruption of gas and smoke in a Michoacán, Mexico, field. (Michoacán Government Officials)
Residents in a Mexican town are on edge as fears grow that a new volcano is brewing beneath their feet.

Despite assurances from experts that a new volcano is not likely to form, a July 9 eruption of gas and smoke from a field, coupled with cracks on the ground in Pueblo Viejo, in the southern state of Michoacán, has left residents fearing the worst, according to Reuters.

Temperatures of nearly 500 degrees Fahrenheit reportedly have been registered in the subsoil.

To protect curious residents, local officials have cordoned off the area.<!–more–>

Mexico City, Parched and Sinking, Faces a Water Crisis


MEXICO CITY — On bad days, you can smell the stench from a mile away, drifting over a nowhere sprawl of highways and office parks.

When the Grand Canal was completed, at the end of the 1800s, it was Mexico City’s Brooklyn Bridge, a major feat of engineering and a symbol of civic pride: 29 miles long, with the ability to move tens of thousands of gallons of wastewater per second. It promised to solve the flooding and sewage problems that had plagued the city for centuries.

Only it didn’t, pretty much from the start. The canal was based on gravity. And Mexico City, a mile and a half above sea level, was sinking, collapsing in on itself…. [read more]