9 things in your home that may be spying on you


Mike Flaim, of Milford, Ohio, is a professional woodworker who likes doing things the old fashioned way, using antique tools to hand-carve wooden tables, bookcases and wall displays.

This is just one reason Flaim’s Smart TV and cable box have him concerned his home technology may be spying on him.

“They can go in my bedroom and know what I’m watching in there. And I don’t think that’s appropriate. It’s no one’s business what I am watching in my bedroom. And it’s just getting worse,” he said.

But Marge Schiller enjoys the latest in home technology. She loves her Amazon Echo and uses all of its features, including asking its personal digital assistant Alexa to order things on Amazon, give her the morning weather report and even play music in her home

“Alexa, play some soft music,” she said, and her home was filled with soothing music within seconds…. read more

Feds to Deploy Facial Recognition Tech at Border Checkpoints


U.S. Customs and Border Protection is planning to unveil a facial recognition program that will track visa holders at U.S. airports while using the same technology on drones to patrol the southern border.

The system, called Biometric Exit, is currently being tested on a one-way flight from Atlanta to Tokyo and is expected to be rolled out to more airports this summer after being expedited by the Trump Administration, according to a report from The Verge.

The current practice used by Customs and Border Protection agents is to take photos and fingerprints of every visa holder who enters the U.S., but there is no system in place to verify that a visa holder has left before their visa expires. This is where Biometric Exit comes in.

Passengers will have their photos taken at the airport before boarding flights, that photo will cross-reference with “passport-style photos provided with the visa application.” If there is no match, then that will raise flags about whether the visitor entered the United States illegally…. read more

Facial Recognition Tech Could Ensnare Millions Of Innocent Americans For Crimes They Didn’t Commit


SpyIt’s often the case that new technologies arrive on the scene faster than our society and its legal code can keep up. Sometimes this can be a good thing. For instance, 3D printing allows people to print out unregulated gun parts, thus allowing gun owners to circumvent the onerous laws of our government, which has struggled to come up with new laws to restrict the technology.

When technology advances at a breakneck pace however, it can also be quite dangerous for our liberties. This is especially true in regards to privacy. If a new technology makes it easy for the government to track us, you can bet that the government is going to take its sweet time updating the legal code in a way that will protect us from surveillance.

That certainly seems to be the case with facial recognition software. During a recent Congressional Oversight Committee hearing,members of both political parties sounded the alarm on the FBI’s use of the technology, and read the written testimony of Electronic Frontier Foundation senior staff attorney Jennifer Lynch:… read more

THE MASSIVE SPY AGENCY YOU HAVEN’T HEARD OF


The Massive Spy Agency You Haven’t Heard OfIf you’re one of the countless Americans who was distraught to learn of the revelations made by former National Security Agency (NSA) contractor Edward Snowden, the mere idea that there might be yet another agency out there – perhaps just as powerful and much more intrusive – should give you goosebumps.

Foreign Policy reports that the National Geospatial-Intelligence Agency, or NGA, is an obscure spy agency former President Barack Obama had a hard time wrapping his mind around back in 2009. But as the president grew fond of drone warfare, finding a way to launch wars without having to go through Congress for the proper authorization, the NGA also became more relevant. Now, President Donald Trump is expected to further explore the multibillion-dollar surveillance network… read more

With Washington’s Blessing, Telecom Giants Can Mine Your Web History


….Google and Facebook have built huge businesses powered by reams of data they collect about consumers’ online actions, both on their own properties and across the web. That trove of information largely explains their dominance — combined, they have a roughly 47% share of the global digital ad market, according to eMarketer.

But online advertising executives say telecom providers potentially have access to more powerful data than the two tech powerhouses. Their networks — both wired and wireless — could give them a window into nearly everything a user is doing on the web.

“ISPs like Verizon can now start building and selling profiles about consumers that include their friends, the news articles they read, where they shop, where they bank, along with their physical location,” said Jason Kint, chief executive of digital media trade body Digital Content Next and a vocal proponent of the rules that Congress voted to repeal…. [read more]

lhwm notes: This is why we provide these companies as an alternative. Hope you like them as much as we do.

These search engines protect your privacy when searching,

StartPageStartpage

duck-duck-go-logoDuck Duck Go

Good Gopher

These browsers protect your privacy and are similar to internet explorer, chrome etc.

Epic

Brave

Tor