Microaggressions and Trump


America has a long tradition regarding new presidents. Their arrival in office is accompanied by a spirit of goodwill in Washington and the country. We call it the “honeymoon.” It once last for several months after the inauguration. But in recent years the honeymoon has been getting shorter and shorter. President-elect Donald Trump didn’t even get through the night of his election before protestors took to the streets.

Only in the days leading up to the Civil War was America this divided. But even then, the discourse was rarely as angry and inflamed as today. Compare the Lincoln-Douglas debates with this year’s debates and you’ll see what I mean. Lincoln and Douglas disagreed. They jabbed at one other. But they also spoke respectfully.

You might answer, “Yes, but these are different times.” And that’s my point…. read more

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Humanity and North Korea by Hal Lindsey


In the last few days, the United States and North Korea have engaged in a battle of blazing rhetoric. It’s been a cold war of hot words.

After the UN Security Council passed a sanctions resolution against North Korea last week, the rogue state promised a “thousands-fold” revenge against the United States. They threatened to “turn the U.S. mainland into the theater of a nuclear war.”

President Trump said, “North Korea best not make any more threats to the United States. They will be met with fire and fury like the world has never seen.”

Acting as an accelerant on the blazing rhetoric was news that North Korea has now passed another milestone in its quest to make the U.S. mainland vulnerable to its nuclear weapons. On Tuesday, major media outlets, starting with the Washington Post, began saying that the Defense Intelligence Agency now believes North Korea has the ability to miniaturize nuclear weapons for use on ICBMs…. read more

What’s Next For Syria?


By Hal Lindsey

The western media remains fixated on Washington, but outside of D.C., the world is spinning toward a series of potential catastrophes. Decisions made over the coming days will affect the future of all humanity. I could illustrate this by examining any of the world’s regions. But, for now, let’s focus on the nations in and around Syria.

One of the eeriest specters of our time is the image of Russia and Iran sitting on Israel’s doorstep in Syria. The well-known prophecy in Ezekiel 38 tells of a coming battle with those two countries leading a coalition of nations against Israel.

Russia arrived in Syria ostensibly to fight ISIS. Will they leave when ISIS is defeated? I doubt it. Bashar al-Assad, Syria’s President, is no longer his own man. He sold his soul to Vladimir Putin, the mad mullahs running Iran, and the Hezbollah terror group…. read more

Suicide Epidemic by Hal Lindsey


According to the U.S. Centers for Disease Control, more people died last year from suicide than from auto crashes. We most associate killing oneself with the young, but it strikes across the lines of age, race, and culture. It affects society in unexpected ways. Foreign Policy magazine ran an article with the headline, “America’s Suicide Epidemic Is a National Security Crisis.”

But it’s not just an American phenomenon. According to the World Health Organization, global suicide rates have risen more than 60% in the last 45 years. Almost a million people a year are known to succeed at taking their own lives. But that number is almost certainly low because of the extreme stigma in many cultures against suicide. People in those places kill themselves in ways that look accidental, or the family covers up afterward.

The epidemic took on a new dimension when we learned about an 8-year-old boy who apparently took his own life in Cincinnati. In a case of extremely violent school bullying, the boy had been beaten unconscious. The school called his mom. She went to pick him up, and both school officials and the boy told her that he had “fainted.”… read more

The Trojan’s New Horses


By Hal Lindsey

Is an American computer virus responsible for the many failed North Korean missile tests? In March, the New York Times reported, “Three years ago, President Barack Obama ordered Pentagon officials to step up their cyber and electronic strikes against North Korea’s missile program in hopes of sabotaging test launches in their opening seconds.”

North Korea’s missile program started with a surprising level of success. But in the last three years, whether caused by U.S. computer sabotage or not, they have had a stunning number of test launch failures.

The experts say that North Korean scientists learn from every failure. While that’s usually true, it may not be in this case. The scientists may already know the problem. It could be that their impetuous young “Supreme Leader,” Kim Jung-un, is pressing too hard, not giving them the time needed to do the job. If that’s the case, the question is not whether the scientists are learning the lesson, but is he?… read more

Walls by Hal Lindsey


Wednesday’s terror attack in London may seem small compared to others. But it could turn out to be one of the most significant terrorist events of recent years.

Last year’s attack on a gay nightclub in Orlando, for instance, killed 49 and injured another 53. The London attack had nowhere near that number. But it struck at what could be considered the heart of western civilization.

The Independent reports that British Prime Minister Theresa May was just forty yards away from the point where the terror suspect was shot down. They said, “Witnesses saw Ms. May being led to a silver Jaguar, as what sounded like gunfire could be heard.”

The final shooting took place just outside Parliament. Big Ben stands above the area. Westminster Abbey — historic home of British coronations, as well as royal weddings and funerals — is just feet away. Buckingham Palace is a quick walk from there. On the walk, you pass the headquarters of the Metropolitan Police, better known as Scotland Yard. At every turn, offices of government are a stone’s throw away. Number 10 Downing Street is two blocks to the north. This is the heart of London and one of the most strategic areas on earth…. [read more]

Leaks And Floods :: by Hal Lindsey


 It has becoming more and more obvious that the CIA documents recently released by WikiLeaks are genuine. The documents discuss the agency’s use of computer programs designed to breach the security of smartphones, smart TVs, computers, and the rapidly expanding category known as “the internet of things.” The CIA apparently has a team dedicated to Apple products, and another working on programs that will allow them to take control of self-driving cars.

None of this is surprising. We task them with keeping track of enemies and hunting down terrorists who hide in the shadows. When it comes to ISIS, al-Qaeda, North Korea, Iran, Russia, or China, my concern is that we have too little information.

Most of us agree that we want that kind of surveillance. But such tools can also be turned inward. When Stalin ran the Soviet Union, he had secret police, wiretaps, and communities full of government informants. He had spies everywhere. But he had nothing compared with what’s available today…. [read more]

Jerusalem, Jerusalem by Hal Lindsey


Throughout the 2016 campaign, President Donald Trump said he would move the U.S. Embassy in Israel from Tel Aviv to Jerusalem. But we’ve heard that before.

In 1996, the Republican Party platform said, “A Republican administration will ensure that the U.S. Embassy is moved to Jerusalem by May 1999.” The Republicans lost that year, so we don’t know if they would have kept their promise.

However, in 1995, Congress passed the “Jerusalem Embassy Act.” The bi-partisan bill stated, “Jerusalem should be recognized as the capital of the State of Israel; and the United States Embassy in Israel should be established in Jerusalem no later than May 31, 1999.”… [read more]