Mom-and-Pop Joints Are Trouncing America’s Big Restaurant Chains


There’s a limit to unlimited breadsticks after all.

Americans are rejecting the consistency of national restaurant chains after decades of dominance in favor of the authenticity of locally owned eateries, with their daily specials and Mom’s watercolors decorating the walls.

It’s a turning point in the history of American restaurants, according to Darren Tristano, chief insights officer at Chicago-based restaurant research firm Technomic.

“This really seems to be the dawning of the era of the independent,” Tristano said. “The independents and small chains are now outperforming. The big chains are now lagging.”… read more

Customer Treats Strangers To A Sweet Surprise


FORT WORTH (CBS11) – On what is traditionally its busiest night of the week, Sweet Sammies only had one paying customer.

Saturday night, a man the Fort Worth ice cream shop identified as “Mr. Gary,” racked up a $1,300 bill by picking up strangers’ tabs.

“He stood here all night and bought everyone’s ice-cream until we closed,” said shop owner Kory Close.

“He came in and actually bought a water,” said manager Darell Cook.

“He said, ‘You know what, I’m going to pay for everybody’s food that’s in here.”… read more

Explosion in rickets, gout and scarlet fever caused by processed junk food and inflationary monetary policy


(Natural News) Poor diet, financial insecurity, and falling standards of living are factors that contribute to the rising incidence of Victorian-era diseases — such as gout, rickets, scarlet fever, and syphilis — in modern-day Great Britain.

The U.K. Faculty of Public Health (FPH) stressed that poor wage growth and persistent inflation has greatly affected nutrition intake among poorer families in the U.K. This proves true in the case of obesity, as the condition remains to be the biggest food poverty issue. According to the FPH, poorer families were forced to opt for cheaper, mostly processed foods in place of nutritious foods.

Clinicians and hospitals noted an increasing number of children suffering from diet-related diseases, which was a result of limited access to healthy foods. Health experts also observed a 19% increase in the number of people hospitalized for malnutrition during the previous 12 months. (RELATED: Explore more news about disease prevention at Prevention.news.)… [read more]

New U.N. report reveals pesticides NOT needed to feed the world


Image: New U.N. report reveals pesticides NOT needed to feed the world

(Natural News) Pesticides and herbicides have infiltrated the world’s food supply at an alarming rate. Each year, over one billion tons of pesticides are used in the United States alone. Worldwide, that number reaches over 5 billion tons annually. And in many ways, pesticides are more harmful to the food supply and the environment than the pests they are designed to kill. Look no further than the declining bee populations if you want evidence of that; bees are essential for pollination for many types of crops and plants, yet the penchant for pesticides is killing them off in droves.

One of the most common myths perpetuated by the agrochemical industry is that these harmful chemicals are essential for feeding the world’s population — but are these altruistic claims founded in reality, or are these assertions of a more sinister, profit-driven variety? A new report from the United Nations suggests that the necessity of pesticides for ceasing world hunger is, at best, nonexistent…. [read more]

Low-quality food has destroyed the bodies of millennials; bowel cancer explodes in young generation


(Natural News) A new study shows an alarming trend in bowel cancer: millennials, or those born between 1980 and 1995, have four times the likelihood of developing rectal tumors originating in the large intestine than those born in the 1950s. Young people also have double the risk of colon tumors, and this is being blamed on poor diets and a lack of exercise.

Experts like the American Cancer Society’s Dr. Rebecca Siegel are calling for educational campaigns and earlier screenings as well as a stronger emphasis on active lifestyles and healthy eating.

Diseases like bowel cancer, also known as colorectal cancer, have traditionally been associated with the elderly, but an affinity for unhealthy food has led to an epidemic in younger people. A shift in the general population’s eating habits toward a diet that is low in fiber and high in processed meats such as sausage and bacon is believed to be one of the main culprits…. [read more]